Multi-Grain Crepes

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Do you know what a food hack is? It’s a way to make your cooking life a little easier, or a different, innovative way to prepare a food.
Here’s a way to use your package of Reesor’s Multi-Grain Pancake Mix to go a little “gourmet”—make crepes.

Yields about 12-14, 6 inch crepes

1 cup of dry Reesor’s Multi-grain Pancake Mix or white flour
2 cups milk
2 eggs
2 Tbsp canola oil or melted butter

Put one cup of the dry pancake mix in a blender.  Grind until smooth textured.

Add the remaining ingredients to the blender and whir until blended.
Transfer to a bowl or put the blender jar in the fridge for about 30 minutes to rest and to let the air bubbles release (if you have time). Or just go ahead with the next steps.

Preheat over medium-high heat, an approximately 8” frying pan or a crepe pan if you have one.
Add a small amount of oil. Pour a little less than 1/4 cup of batter into the hot pan and tilt the pan to spread the batter into a thin, round layer. Turn the crepe when it is bubbly, firm and lightly browned on the other side. Loosen the edges before turning. Then turn and brown it on the other side.
Stir the batter and scoop it from the bottom of the bowl each time you scoop out the batter.  Repeat. Flip the finished crepes onto a plate, stacking them up until ready to fill and serve.

Be prepared for the first one or two crepes to be imperfect, but as you go along the crepes should look better. If you use plain flour instead of pancake mix add about 1/4 teaspoon of salt.

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Filling suggestions

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Sauté 2 cloves of mashed garlic and make a white sauce or a cream sauce, and add shredded cheddar cheese or your favourite cheese with 1 tsp of lemon juice to the sauce.  Serve with asparagus.

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Whipped cream and strawberries.

Ontario Asparagus are now in season

Ontario Asparagus

Ontario Asparagus

These gorgeous spears of Ontario goodness are delicious grilled, steamed, roasted, stir-fried and raw. They’re loaded with nutrients and fibre.  Get them at Reesor’s and enjoy the Ontario asparagus season!

Reesor’s Farm Market is now open for the season

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The past few weeks we’ve been scrubbing, painting and moving shelving and check-out counters around at our farm market at 10825 Ninth Line, readying it for you for the summer.

Inside the market you’ll find a new cut flower stand, hanging baskets for the shade, lots of Ontario strawberries, rhubarb, greenhouse vegetables, and all your favourite baking.  Outside you’ll find our hanging baskets for the sun, vegetables and tomatoes to transplant into your garden, plus two benches to relax and enjoy some cookies after you shop.

We’re all looking forward to welcoming you back to shopping in the fresh air at the farm.

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Reesor Farm Market opens for the season June 12

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We’re looking forward to welcoming you back to Reesor Farm Market on Thurs. June 12 at 9:00 a.m. marking the beginning of the Ontario growing season.  if you haven’t been to our farm market we think you will enjoy shopping in the fresh air at our farm on the 9th Line near Elgin Mills Rd., Markham.

At Reesor Farm Market we offer only fruits, vegetables, baking, and preserves from Ontario.  So, if you are trying to eat local you can be assured that everything at our farm market is the best of Ontario.

On opening day you can look forward to being greeted by our friendly staff who will be happy to see you again and who are happy to be back working at the farm.  You’ll also find the first of Ontario strawberries from southwestern Ontario, greenhouse vegetables,  lots of Reesor’s baking and beautiful hanging baskets.

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Seeds–really small, but really important

by Jay Reesor

For those of you who follow us on Facebook you already know that we received some of our seeds to plant for this year’s crops at our farm. In the shipment boxes were sweet corn, bean, pumpkin and squash seeds.

I select vegetable seeds for many different characteristics. For example, I evaluate sweet corn seed based on the number of days from planting to harvest, the corn’s eating texture and flavour, its vigour when growing, its cob size, its disease resistance, its husked appearance, its unhusked appearance, its ease of picking, its tip cover….. you get the idea.

Every variety of sweet corn seed has a large number of traits and I need to select the seeds that are just right for our Markham growing location. The trait selection list is also lengthy for the other types of vegetable seeds that we grow.

By the way, none of the vegetable seeds that we plant or the strawberry plants that we grow are GMO. The seed varieties that I choose to plant are superior strictly because of the old-fashioned plant breeding techniques that have been around for generations.

GMO seeds and the food they produce are a topic of considerable debate for some people. Food is such an important issue worldwide and I am committed to learning more, and invite you to learn more, about food systems….from every perspective.

Now that I have these amazing small seeds in the shed I am starting to get very anxious to get on the land and get the growing season started!  Those seeds may be small, but like so many things in life that are small, they are really, really important.

Happy seed selection to all you gardeners. Choose some good ones!

Eating locally in late winter

by Jay Reesor

The other day I was taking an inventory in our town market’s produce section of all of the things grown here in Ontario. The list is really quite long including leeks, mushrooms, fabulous sweet carrots, potatoes, English cucumbers, sweet potatoes, two kinds of  onions, parsnips, beets and cabbage.

The Ontario fruit selection is more limited with several varieties of apples, but they are incredibly delicious. Have you tried the amazing crisp, sweet Red Prince apples?  There are also the jarred peaches, pears and raspberries that the Brubachers preserved for us last summer.

Recently in our home, we’ve been enjoying Ontario carrots and parsnips chopped in one inch chunks tossed with olive oil, herbs and roasted.  They are delectable!  So, it is possible to enjoy lots of local, Ontario grown food even in the middle of winter. This helps keep Ontario farmers in business and food miles limited.

Have youfound your own amazing, local food winter recipe yet?

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Roasted Vegetables with Maple-Balsamic Dressing

You can use any combination or amount of the vegetables below or experiment with your own favourites.  Try serving this side dish with BBQ’d or baked sausages or fish, cole-slaw or a green salad, and a cranberry relish or other condiment.  Serve warm as a side dish or at room temperature as a salad.

The beets take the longest to cook, so if you are short on time give them a head-start in the microwave and finish them in the oven.  Try to use large cookie sheets and avoid over-crowding the vegetables, so they roast and brown more quickly.

About 8 servings

• 2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 inch cubes
• 2 large parsnips, peeled and cut into ¾ inch pieces
• 2 carrots, scrubbed or peeled and cut into 3/4 chunks
• 3 beets, scrubbed or peeled and cut into ¾ inch chunks
• 1 red onion, chopped into 1 inch chunks
• 2 red peppers, chopped into 1 inch chunks
• 1 cup Brussels sprouts, trimmed
• 1 lb mushrooms, quartered
• ½ cup olive oil
• 1 tsp salt
• 1 tsp pepper
• 1 Tbsp garlic, minced

Dressing
This makes almost 2 cups of dressing which provides extra for other salads.

• 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
• 3 Tbsp maple syrup
• 2 Tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
• 1 tsp salt
• 1 tsp black pepper
• 2/3 – 1 cup olive or canola oil (depending on your taste)
• 1 cup fresh basil, chopped, optional

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Wash and prepare all vegetables.  Place parsnips, carrots and sweet potatoes in one bowl, beets in their own bowl, and remaining vegetables in another bowl.

Whisk together oil, salt, pepper and garlic.  Divide oil mixture among the 3 bowls and toss to coat.

Put the parsnips, carrots, sweet potatoes and beets on one parchment lined baking sheet, leaving a gap between the beets and other vegetables.  Put the rest of the vegetables on another parchment lined baking sheet.

Roast for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.  When the onions are softened, remove the onion mixture from the oven and set aside to cool.  Continue to cook the remaining vegetables until they are tender and a little crisp (another 20-25 minutes), then remove from oven and set aside to cool.

Combine all the dressing ingredients, except the basil.  When the vegetables have cooled slightly, add dressing to taste.  Toss well to coat.  Garnish with the fresh basil.

Adapted from Whitewater Cooks at Home