Celebrating a good crop year

It has been a good year here on the farm. All of our  main crops did really well including the strawberries,  sweet corn and pumpkins, despite some very wet weather in the spring and very dry weather in the summer.  Our early green bean crop, however,  was totally rained out in the spring and was almost a total failure.


Usually seen on a tractor in the summer, Jay spends some time helping out at our town market in the winter. 

I am grateful for our successes and for all of the people who helped with our crops including my farmer nephew Grahame, and neighbours Jacob Reesor and Peter Reesor. These guys all worked really hard in the strawberry, sweet corn and pumpkin fields to contribute to a successful cropping year.

What do we do with our failures?  Our green bean crop was so bad most of it was not worth harvesting.  We can quit and feel sorry for ourselves or we can learn from our failures, make improvements and move on. That’s what we’re doing with the green beans and I have found that’s the best recipe for success with personal failures as well.

I hope all of our readers have a wonderful Christmas season and a peaceful and rewarding new year.

Pumpkins, sweet corn & plant breeding–a helpful mix

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by Jay Reesor

It’s the time of the year when we head to the field to cut pumpkins. No, we don’t go and make jack o’lanterns, but we do cut the pumpkins from the vines and put them in bins to bring to the market. And we do have some nice pumpkins in the field this year despite the dry, dry summer. All of the pumpkins are a little bit smaller than they would be if we’d had normal rainfall, but the quality is still very nice.

And speaking of quality: plant breeders have not only produced some much improved pumpkin varieties, but improved varieties of other crops as well. They’ve improved the sweetness and tenderness of our corn and the stem quality on the pumpkins and bred green beans to mature uniformly on the plant to facilitate harvest. All of this has been done with plant breeding and not genetic engineering.

Hey there high school and university students who love science. Looking for a calling? Consider plant genetics and plant breeding and make an important contribution to our community and the world’s food supply!

Thanksgiving hours

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Our corn maze and pick your own pumpkin patch will be open Thanksgiving Monday from 11:00 till 5:00.  The farm market retail area and town market will be closed Thanksgiving Sunday and Monday.

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Bring your friends and family for a fun time exploring our corn maze. We charge a small fee to enter the corn maze with proceeds in 2016 going to the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.  ($3/person or $10/family)

It’s time for pumpkins

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🎃  It’s free to enter our farm’s pick your own pumpkin patch and there are lots of photo opportunities with pumpkins and corn. Fill a wheelbarrow for $35 or buy them individually for $.35/lb.

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🎃 Straw bales, mums and corn stalks are available for your outdoor decorating.

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🎃  Lots of ready-picked pumpkins, large and small gourds are available at both our locations.

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Reesor’s Farm Market is now open for the season

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Welcome to a new farm market season shopping in the fresh air at Reesor’s Farm Market. Our returning and new staff are ready to serve you bringing you the best of our farm and other Ontario farms at 10825 Ninth Line, Markham at Elgin Mills Rd.

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Harvest thoughts

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by Jay Reesor

After our farm market opens for the season in June the summer seems to go by so quickly! It seems like we just got the planting done, but now it’s harvest time. Our high school and university students have gone back to school and now fall is here.  Even though summer is a lovely memory, fall brings us good things like fresh apples and pumpkin pies. Speaking of pumpkins, it looks like a good crop, especially of small and medium-sized pumpkins. Their size reflects the dry summer that we had.

We are still picking great sweet corn, tomatoes, green beans and sunflowers. So it is a busy season around here and it makes me grateful for the quality staff that we have, not just at the farm and farm market, but also at our kitchen and our town market. I hope that Fall 2015 is a wonderful time for you!

Corn maze now open

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Follow the straw path through the field southeast of our farm market where you can explore our corn maze. It’s fun and challenging for all ages, so bring the whole family.  Check out this year’s new design–we think it’s better than ever. We charge a small fee to enter the Corn Maze with proceeds in 2015 going to the Canadian Food Grains Bank.  ($3/person or $10/family)

Ready-picked pumpkins are now available in our farm market and a little later on at Reesor’s in Stouffville.

Bring your camera for photos in the pumpkin patch and with our giant strawman.  It’s free to enter our pick your own pumpkin patch which will open about Oct. 1.

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After you make it through the corn maze you’ll walk beside rows of beans, beets and sunflowers where you can pick your own to take home. Prices are posted by the field or ask in the market.

Read more about pumpkins & our corn maze on our website:  http://www.reesors.ca/pumpkins/

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Ready, set, melt!

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by Jay Reesor

The sap is running, the snow is melting, and the farmers, including Grahame and I, are getting anxious to be out in the fields. It has felt like a long winter and since there have finally been at least a few mild days, many of us are thinking about spring and growing things!

Grahame and I are excited about using some new planting techniques this spring, planting more cover and green manure crops, and trying out a new pumpkin seed to give us a basketball sized pumpkin in early September.

The very first outdoor task for the year will be removing straw from the strawberry plants. Straw has been on the plants all winter long to protect them from those frigid January and February temperatures. Once that job is done, the growing season will begin! So, let’s hope for favourable weather in 2015.

Remember, the best food is the food that you grow yourself. Can you find an area to grow a small garden this year?