Maple-glazed Pork Tenderloin

Maple Glazed Pork Tenderloin

Jay’s sister Karla recently prepared this recipe along with roasted broccoli in a warm lemon, butter, olive oil and garlic sauce; mashed sweet potatoes and a sorbet for dessert.  The leftover pork is great in sandwiches.

This dish is adapted from a recipe by the wonderful test kitchens of the publishers of Cook’s Illustrated.

SERVES 6

INGREDIENTS

3/4 
cup maple syrup
1/4 
cup molasses, light or mild
1/8 
teaspoon ground cinnamon
pinch ground cloves
pinch cayenne pepper
1/4 
cup cornstarch
2 
tablespoons sugar
1 
tablespoon salt
2 
teaspoons ground black pepper
2 
pork tenderloins (1 1/4 to 1 1/2 pounds each) (see Note)
2 
tablespoons vegetable oil
1 
tablespoon whole-grain mustard

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 375 degrees. Stir ½ cup maple syrup, molasses, cinnamon, cloves, and cayenne together in 2-cup liquid measure; set aside. Whisk cornstarch, sugar, salt, and black pepper in small bowl until combined. Transfer cornstarch mixture to rimmed baking sheet. Pat tenderloins dry with paper towels, then roll in cornstarch mixture until evenly coated on all sides. Thoroughly pat off excess cornstarch mixture.
  2. Heat oil in 12-inch heavy-bottomed nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until just beginning to smoke. Reduce heat to medium and place both tenderloins in skillet, leaving at least 1 inch in between. Cook until well browned on all sides, 8 to 12 minutes. Transfer tenderloins to wire rack set in rimmed baking sheet.
  3. Pour off excess fat from skillet and return to medium heat. Add syrup mixture to skillet, scraping up browned bits with wooden spoon, and cook until reduced to ½ cup, about 2 minutes. Transfer 2 tablespoons glaze to small bowl and set aside. Using remaining glaze, brush each tenderloin with approximately 1 tablespoon glaze. Roast until instant-read thermometer inserted in thickest part of tenderloins registers 130 degrees, 12 to 20 minutes. Brush each tenderloin with another tablespoon glaze and continue to roast until instant-read thermometer inserted in thickest part of tenderloins registers 135 to 140 degrees, 2 to 4 minutes longer. Remove tenderloins from oven and brush each with remaining glaze; let rest, uncovered, 10 minutes.
  4. While tenderloins rest, stir remaining ¼ cup maple syrup and mustard into reserved 2 tablespoons glaze. Brush each tenderloin with 1 tablespoon mustard glaze. Transfer meat to cutting board and slice into ¼-inch-thick pieces. Serve, passing extra mustard glaze at table.

NOTE: If your tenderloins are smaller than 1¼ pounds, reduce the cooking time in step 3 (and use an instant-read thermometer for best results). If the tenderloins don’t fit in the skillet initially, let their ends curve toward each other; the meat will eventually shrink as it cooks. Make sure to cook the tenderloins until they turn deep golden brown in step 2 or they will appear pale after glazing. Be sure to pat off the cornstarch mixture thoroughly in step 1, as any excess will leave gummy spots on the tenderloins.

According to Cook’s Illustrated why this recipe works: 

To devise a pork tenderloin recipe with perfectly cooked meat, we settled on a stovetop-to-oven method that gave us a good crust and a succulent and tender interior. For a balanced and substantial maple glaze that would adhere to the meat, we mixed the syrup with molasses and mustard, primed the tenderloin with cornstarch so the glaze would bond to it, and applied a second coat of the glaze when the meat was nearly done.

Eating locally in late winter

by Jay Reesor

The other day I was taking an inventory in our town market’s produce section of all of the things grown here in Ontario. The list is really quite long including leeks, mushrooms, fabulous sweet carrots, potatoes, English cucumbers, sweet potatoes, two kinds of  onions, parsnips, beets and cabbage.

The Ontario fruit selection is more limited with several varieties of apples, but they are incredibly delicious. Have you tried the amazing crisp, sweet Red Prince apples?  There are also the jarred peaches, pears and raspberries that the Brubachers preserved for us last summer.

Recently in our home, we’ve been enjoying Ontario carrots and parsnips chopped in one inch chunks tossed with olive oil, herbs and roasted.  They are delectable!  So, it is possible to enjoy lots of local, Ontario grown food even in the middle of winter. This helps keep Ontario farmers in business and food miles limited.

Have youfound your own amazing, local food winter recipe yet?

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Delicious & gluten-free go together at Reesor’s

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Are you or someone in your family trying to avoid gluten? Reesor’s has many gluten-free soups, entrees, salads and desserts that can be enjoyed by everyone in the family.

From our luscious Butter Chicken to hearty Lentil Sausage Soup to our Quinoa Salad to moist and chewy almond Amaretti Cookies, our foods labeled GF contain no wheat, rye, oats, or barley.

We’ve made gluten-free entrees and baked goods for the past 10 years and they are highly acclaimed and appreciated by our many customers who are avoiding gluten.  You’ll find an entire freezer in our town market stocked with GF entrees and soups.  Craving bread? Try Reesor’s  Spelt Bread or Jennifer’s Original Gluten-Free Multi-Grain Bread.  We carry Jennifer’s bread because we think it tastes the most like regular bread—light and tasty.

Our dry goods shelves are filled with boxed gluten-free muffins, pie pastry, breakfast cereals, crackers, cupcake and bread mixes and dried pastas to stock your pantry.

Although our kitchen and bakery are not gluten-free facilities and foods may contain traces of gluten, we make every effort to prepare these foods with gluten-free equipment and utensils.

Please visit our town market or check out our website for more info and listings of the GF foods made by our cooks and bakers. Click Here

Winter. What’s it good for?

by Jay Reesor

At this time of year many of us are already very tired of winter. Perhaps this winter especially, with the extremely cold temperatures and then the awful ice storm and power outages. Unless we are skiers or snowshoe enthusiasts, what is winter good for?

Well on the farm, winter is good for something!  Those very cold temperatures help to destroy plant disease organisms as well as make life very difficult for overwintering insects. Although we obviously cannot be growing things year-round in the fields of southern Ontario, winter is indeed good for something.

But winter won’t be here forever and there are a few signs of spring out here on the farm. The first sign of course is the longer days. Hurray! The second  is the calendar. Because in a few days it will be February and that means time for the maple syrup producers to tap their trees. Now that is a sign of spring for sure and then soon we won’t have to think about winter for a long, long time!

Santa Lucia Cheese

Reesor’s now carries a delicious handcrafted cheese line, Santa Lucia, made in Toronto by the International Cheese Company.

The Provolone Pignata is wonderful in sandwiches or on a homemade pizza.  It’s mild and full-bodied, but with a hint of salty sharpness.

The pre-packaged grated Parmesan has a good depth of flavour and is convenient.

The Ricotta is fresh-tasting and has a mild nutty flavour.

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Creating 6 of your own signature dishes using Reesor’s Turkey Meatballs

We make our turkey meatballs using ground turkey from Round the Bend Farm in Kettleby, Ont.  They are already cooked for you to heat and serve at home.  They’re made with celery, onions, parmesan cheese, milk, eggs, canola oil and other seasonings.  Made with Jennifer’s Original GF bread they are gluten free.  We also offer frozen ground turkey and turkey sausages from Round the Bend Farm.

The kitchen team at Reesor’s is often thinking of different ways of enjoying the foods we make. And if you know some of Jay’s extended Reesor family you may know that we love to talk about and analyze food.

Joyce, who is Jay’s first cousin and is pictured above holding the salad bowl, and his sister Susan put their minds to our turkey meatballs and suggest these six variations.

  1. Heat them in the microwave and add to Reesor’s Vegetable Barley Soup.
  2. Make a meatball sandwich:  Heat the meatballs, slicing them in half and laying them on your choice of bread or bun.  Add sliced provolone cheese, tomato sauce, sautéed mushrooms or sautéed spinach.
  3. Make a wrap:  Heat the meatballs, slice them in half, put them in a tortilla, add salsa, shredded carrots, fresh cilantro, and mozzarella cheese.
  4. Heat the meatballs and serve them on a bed of couscous mixed with almonds, apricots and shredded carrots.
  5. Make a pizza with Reesor’s pizza dough. Add a layer of tomato sauce or pesto, adding meatballs and mozzarella cheese.
  6. Heat them in a tomato sauce; serve over pasta.

Baked French Toast Casserole with Praline Topping

This breakfast treat goes well with warm maple syrup and bacon, and a homemade fruit salad or juice.
It’s easy to prepare and refrigerate in the evening, so you can just pop it in the oven in the morning for breakfast.

Or you can prepare it and bake it without the step of refrigerating it overnight.
Optional extras: raisins, dried cranberries or chopped dried apricots.
4-6 servings.  Need to serve more people? Just double the quantities and bake it in a 9 x 13-inch baking dish.

Ingredients
1/2 loaf bread such as Reesor’s Challah Bread or Raisin Bread (day old works well)
4 large eggs
1 cup half-and-half
1/2 cup milk
1 Tbsp granulated sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
Dash salt
Praline Topping, recipe follows

Directions

Slice the bread into about 4 slices and then cut into 1-2 inch cubes.
Arrange cubes in a generously buttered 9 x 9-inch flat baking dish.
In a large bowl, combine the eggs, half-and-half, milk, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt and whisk until blended.
Pour mixture over the bread cubes, pressing down on the bread making sure it is  covered evenly with the milk-egg mixture.  Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

When ready to bake:  preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Spread Praline Topping evenly over the casserole and push some of the topping into the bread cubes. Bake for 40 minutes, until puffed and lightly golden. Serve with maple syrup.

Praline Topping:
1/4 cup butter , cut into 1/2 inch cubes
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1 Tbsp corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 cup chopped pecans

Combine all ingredients except nuts in a medium bowl and blend well.  Then stir in the pecans.

Ready for winter – the strawberries are all tucked in under their straw

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by Jay Reesor

Way back in sunny, warm August our neighbours delivered about 60 giant, round bales of golden straw. We carefully stacked them up and securely covered them to keep them dry. Last week we uncovered those bales and using our 25-year old bale-buster chopped them up and blew them on our rows of hibernating strawberry plants.

Even though it is an old machine it does an amazing job of distributing the straw over the berries. It saves so much work!

The straw  is used to protect the plants from extremely cold conditions and then in the spring it is helpful to deter the weeds and also keep the strawberries clean. This job is really the final thing we do on the farm for the season. Rather sad, but it is cold and it feels like we should be finished!  But, I am already looking forward to the 2014 farming season.

Have a wonderful Christmas and all best wishes to you in the new year.

Beautiful pork for a beautiful meal

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Chester who makes our delicious smoked pork tenderloin makes a delivery to Ursula one of Reesor’s Market & Bakery deli staff.

If you like smoked pork, bacon, sausages and hams you are in good company with Chester the butcher who is passionate about making a delicious array of smokehouse and deli meats for Reesor’s Market & Bakery.  Chester works at Jo-John Meat Ltd. a small Ontario-inspected meat plant in west Toronto that processes only pork using traditional European recipes for curing, smoking, baking and cooking meats.  Jo-John Meats contain no carrageenan, no flour, and no dairy.

Chester has been interested in butchery ever since he was a boy in Poland visiting his grandfather’s small farm and watching the meat processing done there.  He went to butcher school in Poland and has been making delectable pork products since 1969.   The Jo-John facility has two natural smokehouses using woods such as apple or cherry for a natural smoked taste and they are using traditional spice blends for the various cuts of meat and sausages.

For curing meats they use an industry standard commercial curing mixture providing the correct blend for preserving the meat and prevention of spoilage.  There are no other preservatives or additives in their meats.

Be sure to try their very lean, double smoked bacon or the smoked tenderloin.  The Leek and Pork Meatloaf is wonderful in sandwiches.  If you are in a rush and want a hot meatloaf meal ask the deli clerk for a “steak cut” that you can heat gently at home while you make your own potatoes and veggies.

And what is Chester’s family having for Christmas dinner? A whole, baked, bone-in ham of course.

Lasagne Soup

Here’s a fast and fun way to get the taste of classic lasagne on the table without the fuss of layering and baking.  You start with canned tomatoes, sausage and pasta to make the soup.  Then put a spoonful of ricotta cheese in each bowl, add the soup and then broil the cheeses on top of the bowls of soup.

Customize the soup according to your own taste by using your favourite sausage, adapting the cheeses or try one of the many gluten free pastas we offer at Reesor’s.

Lasagne Soup
6-8 servings

Ingredients:
•   1 Tbsp olive or canola oil
•   1 to 1 ½ lb. sausage with the casing removed (or use ground meat)
•   2 onions, finely chopped
•   2 tsp garlic, minced
•   2 tsp dried oregano
•   1 tsp dried basil
•   1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
•   2 Tbsp tomato paste
•   28 oz. can of diced tomatoes, with juice
•   3 cups chicken broth
•   1 cup water
•   2 bay leaves
•   8 oz curly pasta or about 10 lasagna noodles broken into pieces
•   8 oz ricotta cheese
•   1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
•   2 cups mozzarella cheese, shredded
•   salt & pepper to taste

Preparation:
Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the noodles and cook as the label directs. Drain; drizzle with a little oil and toss to prevent sticking.

Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring, until softened, about 4 minutes.  Avoid browning the onion.

Add the sausage, garlic, oregano and basil and cook, stirring and breaking up the sausage with a wooden spoon, until the sausage is browned, about 5 minutes, until no longer pink. Drain any fat if necessary.

Add the tomato paste and cook, stirring, until darkened, about 2 minutes.  Add the chicken broth, tomatoes and 1 cup water; cover and bring to a simmer. Uncover and cook until slightly reduced, about 20-30 minutes to blend the flavours.

Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Stir in the noodles and simmer 2 more minutes.

In a bowl stir together the shredded mozzarella and the grated Parmesan.

To serve:
Spoon a tablespoon of ricotta in the bottom of each soup bowl. Divide the soup among bowls, pass the grated cheeses and let the soup melt the cheeses.

If you have oven-safe bowls you can broil the two-cheese blend:
Preheat broiler and place oven-safe bowls on a baking sheet. Spoon ricotta, and ladle soup into bowls and top each bowl with the Parmesan and mozzarella blend. Place under broiler with oven door cracked for 3-5 minutes until cheese browns, watching carefully.

Let cool for a few moments before eating.